Thursday, September 8, 2016

Transferring Images and Graphics With Acetone

While I'm getting ready for the 3 French Hens Market in Morris, IL this Saturday, 9-10-16, here's another popular post I'm re-sharing with you.

Originally published in June of 2015, it's a transfer process I use quite often.

I've know for years that you can transfer images with acetone.  However, some techniques can get messy (Pouring the acetone on the back of an image, etc). The following method is quite simple.



As most of you know, I often use the blender pen for transferring images.  You can review that technique by clicking HERE.

One day, I was in the midst of transferring, and, realized that every single one of my blender pens were out of juice.  So, I grabbed a glass bottle, and, my container of acetone.



I dipped the pen in the acetone.




The acetone absorbed, and, I finished my project, using the pen as if it were brand new.

Okay, bare in mind, you're going to have to keep dipping the pen, if you have a large image to transfer.  Don't pour a large amount of acetone into an open container, and, leave it sitting.  It will evaporate.  As you can see in the photo above, I used just enough to keep the tip of the pen wet.

Just like the blender pen method of transferring, you need to have a toner based (laser, xerox, etc.) copy.  Ink jet prints "will not work".

I'm using "PURE" acetone here, NOT fingernail polish remover.  You can get it at your local hardware, or, home improvement store.

PLEASE, adhere to warnings on the label, wear protective gloves, and,  USE IT IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA.

I've used this method on metal, as you can see on the galvanized pail above.

I've also used it on wood,




my painted designs,







and, vintage salvaged wood.




If you don't have a blender pen, you can use a cotton swab.  Or, should I say, multiple cotton swabs, depending on the size of your transfer.  Make sure to apply pressure when rubbing.


It works on fabric as well.  I used it to transfer the graphics onto the pillow, and, the fabric covered books below.





So, give acetone a try, if you haven't already.



The graphics you see in this post are courtesy of "The Graphics Fairy".



44 comments:

  1. This is good to know! Bookmarking this because I love how you use it! =)

    Jeanine

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  2. Rosemary,
    Thank you for sharing this, I will give it a try on some galvanized I have. Have a delightful week.
    xoxo,
    Vera

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  3. Thanks for the info! I'm going to try that on a bench I'm about to paint.

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    Replies
    1. Just remember, you don't need to drench the image. Work on a small section at a time, or, do a trial run on a sample piece.

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  4. Thank you so much sweet friend, as I've been wanting to do this to my old tool box as is simple with a whitewash paint.
    Thanks for sharing. I'm pinning.
    Have a great week.
    FABBY

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  5. Great idea and I'm sure it's less expensive than buying pen after pen. I'll have to give this a try. Does it have to be a fresh laser print, or can it be one that's been sitting around awhile?

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    1. Actually, it's better if it's been sitting around for awhile, Betsy. Fresh prints may bleed a bit, because the toner hasn't completely set.

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  6. will this method work on color images(laser copy)?

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  7. Beautiful and so smart of you to think of an alternate way to do this!

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  8. If you use this on fabric, do you have to worry about the fabric bleeding or the acetone staining the fabric.? This is such a great idea. Thanks for showing us.

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    1. You can use a waterproofing sealer on fabric. Just make sure you wait a bit before transferring to avoid bleeding. The toner needs to set.

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  9. Hi Thanks for stopping by my blog. I didn't realize I was a no email reply. Just changed it. Is Scotch Guard considered a waterproof sealer or do you use something else? Thanks!!

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  10. Your projects are amazing here. It looks so simple! I will definitely give this a try!
    Linda
    mysewwhatblog

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  11. I love the galvinized pail! I have tried acetone on primer before with so-so results - it was the old ' on and rub with a spoon' method. It's kinda hard to tell where exactly you've rubbed with the back of a spoon.

    My art store carries empty felt pens that you fill yourself - I wonder if this would work? Also, apparently transfers work well with Xylene; I purchased some but I haven't used this as it seems a bit toxic (and it does melt plastic, so maybe that means back to the 'brush and rub with a spoon').

    Any comments?

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    1. Angela, a pen is a lot easier to control, and, to apply pressure with.

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  12. I love this! Can I use cotton balls as I do not have the pen?

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    1. As I mentioned in the post, you can use a cotton swab (Q-tip). A cotton ball can work too, but, you'll have to use more pressure.

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  13. Does the acetone affect the base paint if you use this technique on painted wood?

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  14. Does the acetone affect the base paint if you use this technique on painted wood?

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    1. Marilyn, it depends on the paint you use. A flat paint is preferred. As long as the paint is completely dry, and, you don't use too much acetone, you should be fine. I always suggest you try it out on a sample piece first!

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  15. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
    I have been turning my brain inside out trying to find out something that resembles sitrasolve product here in Norway, but with no luck. Then I read this post where you use Aceton! I JUST bought a bottle of aceton from the drugstore a couple of weeks ago. Now I cant wait to try this out!
    I dont have a marker like yours though. Do you thing I could use cotton tips? Like the ones you clean your ears with?
    Thank you!

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    1. Oh, I se not that you have already answered the q tip question :)

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  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  17. OK, I hope this works, what do you do if you want to wash it?
    Rosie
    terrylittlesunshine54@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. I can reply!😁Thank you for the inspiration!

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    2. Rosie, it depends on what you are transferring the image to. You just have to seal the surface. There are fabric sealers for material. Use spray sealer, wax, etc., for painted surfaces.

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  18. I'm assuming if you are transferring text you have to print the text in mirror image mode so that it will read correctly once transferred, right?

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  19. I have tried this on unwaxed chalk painted wood and the blender pen/acetone stains the paint with a "wet" look everywhere I go over design. I have also had the paint peel up when removing the design. Do you only touch the areas of the design? I "color" back and forth over the design to make sure and get all of it. Some of the laser copies have come from Staples and wonder if their newer machines make it harder. It seems harder to transfer than an old laser printer by brother has. Any tips?

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    1. Anita, some paints don't work very well with this method. Sometimes I seal the paint before doing the transfer. You also have to work quickly, and, don't use a ton of acetone. You just have to get the tip wet.

      Yes, I've found the older laser printers to work better. Good Luck.

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  20. If you print on normal paper simply ajust the printer settings to "very thin paper" then the printer will not heat the toner so hard to the paper. You have, however, to take care that it don't smear because the toner is not burned 'correctly' into the paper - that's fine here because you'll get more toner to stick to the fabric

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  21. Hi Rosemary, So glad to see a post from you. I think I could even do this techni1ue with your excellent instructions and will save this post. Question: If we use acetone on fabric, does it leave a smell and can the fabric be washed? Thanks. Love you!

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  22. Love it Rosemary! Thanks so much for the tips! Leticia

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  23. Thank you for sharing this information and Very good looking blog.
    new villa projects in thrissur

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  24. Welcome Back Rosemary. Thank you for sharing another of your wonderful ideas.
    Joy

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  25. Hi Rosemary, I am the person who has had zero to minimal luck with every method of transferring I've ever tried. The methods always look like "I could do that!", but upon trying, something always goes terribly amiss. I had officially given up on anything that required a transfer. I see now, another method I've never tried. Looks like "I could do that". I'm going to contemplate this one; I've come to believe I'm just too 'dull' to be able to achieve 'anything transfer'.

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  26. I just tried it and nothing happened. No transfer at all. I do not understand. Laser print, acetone cotton swab. :( I have to transfer lettering onto a cutting board. I have tried gloss gel medium and I always see and outline which I hate. I tried the washable elmers glue mod podge, waited over night and some of it peeled off. I tried so many ways. I thought this would be it. I am so discouraged at this point.

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    Replies
    1. Did you use undiluted acetone? Because I can't see what you're doing, I can only guess. You may need to use more acetone, apply more pressure, etc.

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